All posts by OLLI at NC State University

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at NC State University provides non-credit short courses, study trips, and special events for adults aged 50+. Topics are wide-ranging in the liberal arts and sciences, and we emphasize learning for the joy of learning. Programs range from one-time lectures to six-week courses, and we provide many opportunities to connect with others who share your interests. Although OLLI is a membership organization, and members receive priority registration, some of our programs are open to nonmembers as well. We invite you to join our community of learners!

Geraldine Khaner Velasquez – OLLI Instructor Profile

My Magnificent Obsession

An article that Geraldine Velasquez published in 2004 is called “My Magnificent Obsession.” That, she said in an interview, happens to be jewelry. But it could just as well be graphic design, fiber art, enamel art, Latin American art, quilting, textile design, art therapy, music therapy, movement and dance, writing and healing, and — far ahead of her peers — “Drawing on the computer: Turning a left brain activity into a right brain activity” back in 1996!

Marble and Pin

And of course there’s fine art, reflected in her September OLLI lecture, “The Impressionists: A Brilliant Revolution,” from the 1860s through the 1880s.

Geraldine is a New Yorker born and bred.  “Designers were on my father’s side of the family: clothing, jewelry, hats and more,” she said.  “My concentration in college was textile design, and I worked for various companies for four years until I moved out of the city and switched careers.  Crafts was a big part of what I used to do, but I moved to graphics and the multimedia revolution in the design field.”         

Vyse Ave1cropped

She earned a bachelor of fine arts at Hunter College, an M.A. at Montclair State College, and an Ed.D. at Rutgers. Her doctoral dissertation was on “Attitudes and Beliefs of Contemporary Crafts People” (1987) and she published an article on a similar theme in the N.Y. Times a year later. 

My Hslle Center Exhibition

She taught from 1980 to 2015 at what was originally Georgian Court College in Lakewood, N.J. It was built on land owned by the family of the “robber baron” Jay Gould, and the Sisters of Mercy bought it and turned it into a college. “I had great flexibility in teaching at my small college, which grew to become a university,” she said. “I was able to contribute to the scholarship on studio crafts.  This was at a time when the Museum of Art and Design opened in New York. I was a keynote speaker on women in crafts at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington in 1990.” She said she “loved to introduce new areas into our curriculum at Georgian. Concurrently I introduced computers to the art department, and with time the department became the second biggest undergraduate major.” She chaired the departments of art, communication, graphic design and multimedia.Olli antho 2final cover vote copy

A member of the OLLI Writers Group, Geraldine has published widely.  Her articles often have provocative titles.  For instance: “The Family Photo and the Art of Lying.” It’s about “what you see and what you don’t see,” she explained. “Who’s behind the camera, what isn’t in the picture.” Other examples: “Religion in the Secular Classroom,” “Instilling Beliefs through Graphic Design: Art in the Time of War,” and “The Future Invents the Past: the Ur Teacher.” She’s a founding director and editor of the Forum for Research and Criticism in the Crafts. Among her many honors:  20 years in “Who’s Who in America.” 

She’s a mother and grandmother, and moved with her husband to Holly Springs in 2015 to be closer to them. “And I love it!” she said with a happy smile.

G in Chicago

                                                                                                                                                                         ~ Barbara Haddad Ryan

Barbara is a long time OLLI member and member of the OLLI Voices team. She graduated with an English degree with honors from Swarthmore College and went on to achieve a Masters with honors from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

Her career began at the Denver Post, 1962-1976: were she held various posts including feature writer, art critic, classical music critic, “first female editorial writer on a major Western daily” and TV Critic and columnist on this newspaper for five years.

Subsequent moves in her fascinating career were as political reporter and feature writer for the Rocky Mountain News (Scripps-Howard daily) from 1976-1982,  Public Information Officer for the State of Colorado Office of Energy Conservation from 1982-1986,  Associate Vice President for External Affairs, Swarthmore College from 1992-2000, Public Affairs Director for the National HQ of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Washington D.C. from 2000-2006

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Happy Hearts Trip – Nashville, Tennessee

Nov. 7-10, 2018. Four days of non-stop fun things to see and do.

Nashville was a place I had never visited and always wanted to, so my wife and I jumped at the chance to be part of this fabulous trip.  We belong to Cary First Baptist Church and have gone on other trips, but this was special.  I may now have to buy and learn to strum and pick a guitar.  I believe there are more guitars in Nashville than people!  The eight hour ride via a very nice modern bus was long, a little tiring, but made tolerable by our entertaining tour manager, Jane Trexler, and our very excellent driver, Willie.

LK 1

Our arrival to the Gaylord Opryland Resort hotel was one of the big surprises.  The Gaylord is the largest hotel in the US, advertising a whopping 3000 rooms, covering nine acres, lavish gardens (and I mean lavish), countless waterfalls, a tantalizing water fountain show, and even a river boat ride through the extraordinary tropical gardens.  And of course shops and restaurants galore.  It is large, but well mapped with signs to reduce getting lost, however getting lost is part of the fun at this resort.

2 waterfall

The next day included a bright and early departure for Fontanel Mansion, megastar Barbara Mandrell’s, former home.  It is a 27,000 square foot log home with 13 bathrooms, 5 fire places, 2 kitchens and much more.  The house is now owned by an investor group that run daily tours.  Our tour guide was Steven Whitson a masterful story teller, singer, guitarist, and he gave us two beautiful renditions of songs he composed.  Luckily he had a recorded band back up which shielded the two guitarists, Penny Jacobs, and Larry Kingsley, trying to come up with at least one chord that was right.

4 trio

We moved on to visit The Parthenon, a full-scale replica of the original Parthenon in Athens, Greece.  Built in 1897 as part of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition, and is the center piece of Nashville’s Centennial Park.  Under the main structure is a private collection of some very fine paintings.

5 acropolis style

After lunch we toured Belle Meade Plantation renowned for breeding numerous Triple Crown thoroughbreds, including Secretariat, War Admiral, Affirmed, American Pharaoh and this year’s winner, Justify. Since the paddler wheeler trip and dinner cruise was cancelled we were entertained at the Nashville Nightlife Dinner Show.  A top rated event that in the past featured Hank Williams and Patsy Cline and some of the superstars of today like Sara Evans and Toby Keith.  It was a delightful evening with budding stars performing.

7 performer

The following day was my favorite, a tour of RCA Studio B.  Built in 1957 it became known as the cradle of the Nashville Sound.  More than 35,000 songs were brought to life here including more than 1,000 American hits, 40 million singles and over 200 Elvis Presley recording!  We all took turns standing on the blue tape X on the floor where the artist stood to record the many hit songs.  Following the Studio B tour we boarded the bus to the Country Music Hall of Fame Museum.  It was self-guided and featured the earliest folk roots of music and memorabilia and of the super stars including my favorite, Elvis’s car!

9 car

No visit to Nashville would be complete without visiting Ryman Auditorium.  Revered by many as the “Mother Church of Country Music”, the Ryman Auditorium was the home of the Grand Ole Opry from 1943 to 1974.  The building was built in 1892 by Captain Tom Ryman, after his religious conversion at a tent revival held by Sam Jones.  He wanted a building large and grandiose enough to properly represent God’s church, so the revivals continued until morphing into The Grand Ole Opry home.  Our self-guided tour gave us a sense of history of the years of music that was performed there.  After Dinner at the Opry Backstage Grill, we made our way back to the Ryman Auditorium for a two hour concert which featured about eight different singers and acts along with radio timeout commercials for cowboy boots, hats and western clothing.  It was a delightful evening sitting just a few feet from the “Grand Ole Opry” historic stage.

10 stage

Of course all trips have to end and the next day we made the eight hours bus ride back to Cary with lasting memories of a city built by music.

 

Blog writer: Larry Kingsley

Photos: Gary Frazier

Fairies

GV FAiries

 If I believed in fairies, which I don’t, I wouldn’t have looked for them around the trees in my neighbor’s yard.  But that is where I found them early this morning on my walk. It’s before eight a.m. and I am startled by a view that stops me in my tracks: hundreds of sparkles of light around the trees; rays of dancing, frolicking pinpoints that could only be described as fairy lights.

GV Fairies 3

They are tumbling down shafts of water droplets between leaves and branches between and around the trees, cascading onto the ground in discreet balls of brilliance.

Geraldine V Fairies Nov 2018

It could only be fairies as nothing matches the sheer awe and joy the sight gives me. Laughing, I take out my cell phone and snap picture after picture. A gift has been bestowed upon me, touching some fundamental childhood self that always wanted to find a fairy. And now I have, hundreds and hundreds of them displayed before me in living proof that dreams can come true.

Geraldine Velasquez (OLLI Member, OLLI Instructor, OLLI Writers Group)

 

Transcendental Wild Oats

The wolf shall dwell with lamb

And the leopard shall lie down

  With the kid; and the calf and the

     Young lion and the fatling together,

 And a little child shall lead them.

                                 Isaiah 11:6

 Human longing for a “peaceable kingdom” hasn’t ceased since the seventh century,   B. C. when the prophet Isaiah uttered those words. The idea has had particularly strong appeal among certain groups of people, such as, for example, the Quakers, with their history and tradition of pacifism. Edward Hicks (1780 -1849) a Quaker minister and naive artist, painted no fewer than 62 pictures portraying the scene suggested by Isaiah’s vision.

Animals

Another group inspired by visions of a pastoral utopia were the Transcendentalists in 19th century New England. Not content with mere depictions, some of those Transcendentalists actually attempted to found communal agricultural colonies. Brook Farm, founded in West Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1841, is probably the best known. Among that colony’s founding members was Nathaniel Hawthorne, whose novel The Blithedale Romance draws upon the author’s experience of life in the colony.

Brook Farm failed in 1847, but another such experiment, also in Massachusetts, was even shorter-lived. Named Fruitlands, it’s now a museum. It lasted a mere seven months; but during that brief time it housed an 11-year-old girl who was destined to become another famous American writer. That girl was Louisa May Alcott.

Farm

In some of his 62 paintings of “The Peaceable Kingdom,” Edward Hicks deviated slightly from scripture by having the lamb lie down with a lion rather than a wolf. Louisa May Alcott did likewise in her satirical sketch of Fruitlands, written some 30 years after her childhood sojourn there. One of Fruitlands’ two principal founders was Charles Lane, whom Alcott renames “Timon Lion” in her sketch, titled Transcendental Wild Oats. Her model for “Abel Lamb” is her own father, Bronson Alcott, Fruitlands’ other principal founder, whom Louisa May depicts as an ineffectual dreamer, dominated by Lane’s more forceful personality.

Alcott has great fun mocking her father and his bookish, intellectual colleagues who know nothing about farming and who furthermore are unfit for the physical rigors of farm life. In her satire, as in reality, it was the women who provided such practicality as the colony experienced. The following excerpt will serve to illustrate:

“About the same time the grain was ready to house, some call of the Oversoul wafted all the men away. An easterly storm was coming up and the yellow stacks were sure to be ruined. Then Sister Hope gathered her forces. Three little girls, one boy (Timon’s son) and herself, harnessed to clothes-baskets and Russia-linen sheets, were the only teams she could command; but with these poor appliances the indomitable woman got in the grain and saved food for her young, with the instinct and energy of a mother-bird with a brood of hungry nestlings to feed.”

Despite such heroics, the first year’s crop yield was insufficient to see the colony through the winter, and so it disbanded. Charles Lane joined a Shaker colony. Bronson Alcott was devastated. Recalling his pain, Louisa May drops her satirical tone and reflects on how unforgiving conventional society can be.

Lyle Adley-Warrick (OLLI Member, OLLI Writers Group)

 

Dave Milidonis Honored by NC State’s Association of Retired Faculty

Milidonis Award

OLLI’s military history instructor par excellence, Dave Milidonis, was awarded the William C. Friday Award for Distinguished Service in Retirement by the Association of Retired Faculty at their Awards Luncheon on May 15th.  This award was initiated in 2010 by ARF to recognize annually a retiree who exemplifies dedication to higher education, and in the land grant tradition of NC State, who models what it means to be a servant of society.  Retired President of the Consolidated UNC System and NC State alumnus Dr. William C. Friday was the first recipient of the award that is named in his honor.

In the award presentation remarks, Dave was cited for his teaching excellence, for volunteering to teach five OLLI courses each academic year, and for being such a sought-after instructor that his courses routinely fill during the first day of registration!  He was also recognized for his work as founding Director of the National Veterans History Archival Institute, which records the stories of veterans for their families and for posterity, with videoed interviews being submitted to the Library of Congress as well as to the veterans and their loved ones.  In his acceptance remarks, Dave humbly gave those present one of his amazing history lessons in which he talked about the importance of our country’s history being taught and its veterans’ contributions never being forgotten by present and future generations of Americans.

In receiving this year’s award, Dave became the first honoree who is not a retired NCSU faculty member, and joined three previous Friday Award recipients who regularly teach for OLLI—Jim Clark (2012), Clay Stalnaker (2015) and Ben O’Neal (2017).

Dave was joined at the Awards Luncheon by OLLI members and devotees John Cudd, Harriet Grand, Carol Rahmani, Nancy Huber, and Marcia and Ed Thomas.

 

Carol Rahmani – OLLI member, former Advisory Council and Program Committee chair, currently serving on Program Committee.

James W. Clark, Jr.

Weymouth final

Consider this contrast:  Jimmy Clark, age 9, is one of seven children. He works in his family’s country store and service station on U.S.158 in Vaughan, N.C. He also delivers the daily newspaper and helps to harvest tobacco. As time permits, he does his homework and reads Agricultural Extension bulletins — “Insects 101” — about keeping pests out of those tobacco plants. He also collects bugs that are drawn to the store’s lights at night.

tobacco plant

Flash forward to 2018 and the Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities in Southern Pines, where five distinguished Tar Heels are inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. One of them is James W. Clark, Jr., PhD. professor emeritus of English at NC State. OLLI members know him as Jim, a popular OLLI instructor. But they may not know that he’s the only one who’s taught a course every single year since the program began as Encore! So why does this erudite professor prefer OLLI to university teaching? “I don’t have to grade papers,” he quipped during an interview.

The Literary Hall of Fame celebrates and promotes the state’s rich literary heritage by saluting its leading authors and encouraging great literature. Jim has degrees from UNC — with a scholarship as a national 4-H winner for a project in entomology — and from Duke. Today he focuses most of his scholarship on North Carolina’s “cultural geography” and literary history. He’s had a leadership role in those areas as president of the Thomas Wolfe Society and the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association. He still serves as president of the North Caroliniana Society, which supports the North Carolina Collection at Chapel Hill and preserves and celebrates the state’s culture and history.

4H

The leap from what Jim calls “bugs to books” wasn’t as broad as it sounds, he said, “because 4-H has a broad curriculum that stresses reading, writing and figuring as well as speaking and teaching.” His faculty mentor at State was Richard Walser, another member of the NC Literary Hall of Fame. “He was a great teacher and something of a rascal,” Jim said, “beloved and feared for his critical voice and bawdy sense of humor.”

Jim followed Walser in his roles at State and became director of the nation’s first Humanities Extension program, with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, focusing on North Carolina writers in public TV programs and public school textbooks. He also developed “Talk About Writing” videos about North Carolina writers for classroom use. Proceeds from sales supported outreach to public school teachers. That outreach involved sending faculty members in the humanities — including Jim — to lead seminars around the state on literature and culture. And some faculty conducted summer writing seminars for 4-H youth at the county level. Jim has written a social history of this program, “Clover All Over: North Carolina’s First 4-H Century.”

The Lost Boy

But he may be best known as a champion of two literary figures: Thomas Wolfe and Paul Green. He’s been president of the Thomas Wolfe Society and is still on the editorial board of The Thomas Wolfe Review. Like Walser, he’s devoted many hours to teaching and writing about Wolfe, who had been Walser’s primary focus. Jim discovered Wolfe’s novella, “The Lost Boy,” at Harvard, and the UNC Press published the edition he’d edited in 1992. German and French editions followed.

Jim will teach a course on “The Amazing Genius of Paul Green,” whom he calls a Tar Heel polymath, in OLLI’s next semester. Jim considers him “this state’s most productive and well known playwright.” Green studied and later taught at UNC. Jim said he’s known best for such outdoor dramas as “The Lost Colony,” but won a Pulitzer in 1927 for “In Abraham’s Bosom,” a play about racism and education. A foundation in his name supports playwriting and progressive causes, chiefly racial justice. Jim served as the foundation’s president for a decade.

In addition to other major awards, in 2012 Jim received the William C. Friday Award for Distinguished Service in Retirement. He says Friday “was like God for public education,” and that he worked with Paul Green on progressive issues. The award recognized Jim’s OLLI participation, leading writing workshops at senior living communities, and serving as historian of the state’s 4-H youth development program, based largely at State. Jim’s latest work, a social and political history of his family’s part of Warren County entitled “Finding and Keeping Vaughan: Our Hometown,” was published in November.

Dr Jim Coffee Cup

~ Barbara Haddad Ryan

LISABONA

Lisabona was Lisbon’s name in the sixteenth century. Lisabona came from Olisipo, the name the Romans had given the city more than a thousand years before – Municipium Cives Romanorum Felicitas Julia Olisipo. In the 1500s, amid the fever of the discovery of new maritime routes to countries where the commerce of spices and other riches originated, and driven by the hope of fortunes and fame to be had on those endeavors, the whole world converged into Lisabona. The crowds in the city center had Bretons, Catalans, Normans, Castilians, Genovese, Dutch, Venetian, Africans and, of course, Portuguese. Some came to spy, trying to get the secrets of maritime navigation the Portuguese had developed, others to try their fortune. The chroniclers of those days describe Lisabona as a cosmopolitan city, bustling with people, business and opportunities, the place to be within Europe.

Lisabona

My wife Amy and I just came back from a long vacation in Lisboa, as we Portuguese have been calling Lisbon for centuries. When we walked downtown, for a moment we got the feeling we had traveled back in time to the 1500s. We heard English, French, Italian, Russian, Chinese, and Romanian and hardly any Portuguese. Nowadays these foreigners do not look for fortune or fame; they respond to the slogan Lisbon is the place to be this year. They follow the sun, they come to taste food specialties and wine vintages, to explore beautiful views, historical sites and monuments. They come looking for fun and leave their Pounds, Euros, Yuan, Rubles and Dollars in Portugal. The Portuguese are having a bonanza brought by tourism (more than 20 million people last year), albeit with possible downfalls down the road.

Waterside

Amy and I joined the tourist crowds in Lisbon and throughout Portugal, visited many of the fantastic views and historical monuments, ate in many, many restaurants, mainly fish and seafood, trekked up the mountains, traveled down south to Algarve and basked on the beaches, absorbing the warm sun that crossed the cerulean blue sky, like none on earth. We visited museums and it seems now in Lisbon there is a museum for anything imaginable, some better than others. We visited a millenary church and monastery in Alcobaça with its cloisters, and some obscene golden altars, with beautiful art that centuries of foreign invasions, fires and earthquakes could not obliterate. In Lisbon the aqueduct from 1744 and its distribution water pools were the highlight of one of our days; I was born and raised in Lisbon but had never visited it. We traveled north to Coimbra’s University, one of the oldest in Europe, with its magnificent ancient library, then traveled to Nazaré’s promontory over the ocean, where the tallest wave in the world (78 Ft.) challenges ‘”crazy” surfers every year, and close to home we visited Cabo da Roca one more time, the most western point of continental Europe.

Thus, like all the other tourists, we joyfully, gladly and happily scattered our Dollars from the north to the south of Portugal.

Lisbon from water

Henrique Gomes, OLLI Member, OLLI Writers Group Coordinator